Miale’s Son found a friend

18.02.2018
Cheetah male coalitions usually consist of littermates, who can also accept unrelated individuals. Males, who lost their brothers, have more chances to form a new coalition or join the other group, than those who have been the only cub in the litter. However, in two cases single males joined unrelated males. Interestingly, in two cases, at least one male did not have littermates by the time of separating from the mother. In one case, Nora’s son spent some time with two sons of Imani. In the second case, Miale’s son united with a male, who could have recently lost his brother. A New coalition of two young males came to the Reserve in the end of December 2017, and until the end of January 2018, brothers have been spotted in different parts of the Reserve. We gave them ID numbers M81 and M82. Miale’s son was 18 months old when was spotted last with his mother. When Fast Five (5-male coalition) encountered Miale on 14 February 2018, her son appeared in the same area in a company of M81. It is difficult to say what had happened to M82 and for how long Miale’s son (M85) and M81 will stay together, but relationship between two males are very friendly, which gives a hope that these two males will form a life-long union. It will be beneficial for these young males as they have to share territory with the Fast Five coalition.



Kisaru and Busara – independent life

02.02.2018
Living in a coalition provides a wide range of benefits to its members, including better protection and access to food resources. Amani’s daughters – Kisaru and Busara developed different hunting strategies and one of them was simultaneous hunting for two different objects. They successfully applied it in the areas with mosaic vegetation and hyena’ presence. As a result, one kill could be taken by a hyena, while the other one could serve as a proper meal for both females. Since the middle of January, both females have been spotted separately in a few occasions (we observed them been split by hyenas in the bushland), and then together again. Since the last decade of January, sisters have been spending more time lonely. These young females remained together as long as both benefited equally.



Malaika’s family feeding habits

23.01.2018
Efficiency and strategies of hunting depend on the animals’ personal features (their number, age, physiological status, personal experience) and environmental conditions (landscape, weather, availability and type of prey). Malaika, who has always been efficient hunter, is turning the age of 11 and sometimes has to rely on her 18-months old cubs in getting food. However, her two sons are not very cooperative. Often only one member of the family gets a small prey and does not share it with others. Sometimes, if Malaika gets nothing from her offspring, she takes down a bigger prey to feed all the family. Sometimes, she takes her chance to catch a small animal (hare or fawn) and eat it alone, encouraging cubs to hunt. For the few last days, Malaika was sharing the area with a lonely male Mugi, and their meeting was a matter of time. In the evening Malaika chased an adult Tompson gazelle male, but missed it. However, when we reached the spot, where she had stopped, we found 4 cheetahs, and among them Mugi. He was circling around Malaika, who was greedily eating a small fawn. In a few minutes they both were feeding from the same carcass and finished it within 10 minutes. Both adults were calm and confident, which could indicate their possible previous encounters and absence of danger from either side. Moreover, behavior of the male and his presence directly at the prey, could be a sign of her kleptoparasiting from his kill. Cubs were curious and impatient; they did not get any food that evening but a lot of impressions.



New cheetahs in the Reserve – Kiraposhe’s cubs

18.01.2018
Dear friends, colleagues and partners, wishing you Merry Christmas and Happy New year! Thank you for your long-term support and continuous interest in wildlife conservation. This year was very fruitful and brought us new scientific discoveries and achievements, which would not be possible without your comrehensive assistance. We enter a new year with new plans and perspectives, and look forward to sharing with you our knowledge and new findings. Through thousands of years cheetahs escaped extinction, and now they need us on their race to survival. Only together we can save these magnificent creatures for posterity!



Merry Christmas and Happy New year!

31.12.2017
Dear friends, colleagues and partners, wishing you Merry Christmas and Happy New year! Thank you for your long-term support and continuous interest in wildlife conservation. This year was very fruitful and brought us new scientific discoveries and achievements, which would not be possible without your comrehensive assistance. We enter a new year with new plans and perspectives, and look forward to sharing with you our knowledge and new findings. Through thousands of years cheetahs escaped extinction, and now they need us on their race to survival. Only together we can save these magnificent creatures for posterity!